Back to top

Issue No. 68 / New York Minute / July 2015 (download PDF)
by Jan Vink and Robin Blakely-Armitage, Cornell University

Fertility rate by Age and Income, NYS, 2013
Source: American Community Survey 2000-2013, U.S. Census Bureau.

The number and timing of births women experience varies according to their age as well as their income level. In NYS, as across the United States, this variation can be quite striking. Low income is strongly correlated with births among teenagers and women in their 20s, while higher income is associated with delayed childbirth (until ages 30-40). For teenagers, the income effect is particularly apparent, with those in the bottom 20% income bracket experiencing fertility rates similar to middle income women in their early 20s and higher income women in their late 20s. Over the past decade, births to younger women (<24 years old) of all income levels have declined slightly. These patterns and trends can have important community development impacts. Having children at a young age can negatively impact educational and employment outcomes, and can exacerbate conditions leading to poverty. Knowledge of, access to, and willingness to take advantage of reproductive healthcare and other family planning services is a key predictor, along with age and income, of fertility trends.

Fertility by lowest income group
Source: American Community Survey 2000-2013, U.S. Census Bureau.
Fertility by middle income
Source: American Community Survey 2000-2013, U.S. Census Bureau.
Fertility by highest income group
Source: American Community Survey 2000-2013, U.S. Census Bureau.

Additional Resources

See Part 2 of this data series: Fertility Rates Vary by Age and Income in New York State, Regional Patterns


About the New York Minute publication series

The New York Minute is a publication of Cornell University’s Community & Regional Development Institute (CaRDI), produced in collaboration with the Program on Applied Demographics (PAD). These publications are free for public reproduction with proper accreditation.

PAD and CaRDI logos


CaRDI Publications

Subscribe to RSS news feed