CaRDI Publications

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CaRDI publications provide our readers with research-based information to help foster dialogue at the local, regional and state-level, and to inform public and private decision-making around critical community and economic development issues. Our publications are written by university faculty, state agency representatives, and CCE Educators, among other partners.

These publications are free for public reproduction with proper accreditation. For questions and comments about the CaRDI publications, please contact Robin Blakely-Armitage at rmb18@cornell.edu.

CaRDI Publications

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Comparing Millennials to Baby Boomers in New York State

Feb 9, 2018
Much has been written about how Millennials differ from previous generations, especially with regards to social media, consumption patterns, social mores, technology and more. The term Millennial generally refers to the demographic cohort born in years ranging from the early 1980s to the late 1990s. Using 2015 data from the U.S. Census Bureau for New York State, we compare Millennials to younger Baby Boomers, a cohort aged 25-34 years old in 1990. We discover significant differences. Read more
Overdose Deaths Involving Opioids, US 2000-2015

Opioids in our Communities: Drug Overdose Deaths in New York State

Nov 28, 2017
Drug overdose deaths have risen steadily in recent years, becoming the leading cause of death in the United States. More than 60% of overdose deaths involve the use of opioids. In New York State (NYS), drug overdose deaths increased by 20% between 2014 and 20152, but declined again between 2015 and 2016. While drug use and drug overdoses have long been viewed as primarily an urban issue, drug overdose death rates in large central metropolitan areas were surpassed in 2008 by rates in less densely populated areas. Opioid and other drug use has been linked to several factors, including social, cultural, and economic stressors. Read more
Interstate job changes in and out of New York State, by Industry (2010-2015 Q3)

Exploring Job-to-Job Flows In and Out of New York State

Jul 20, 2017
Issue Number 78/June 2017. Robin Blakely-Armitage and Jan Vink, Cornell University

When people change jobs, they often do so in order to increase earnings, particularly younger workers. Other job transitions are due to firm relocation, firings or other separations, and may occur to or from unemployment status. In the United States, there is a tremendous amount of worker reallocation, with significant movement across state lines. The Census Bureau provides data on job transitions (job-to-job flows) and has recently developed a user-friendly interface to track these movements. This unique data allows a comprehensive look at the reallocation of workers across different sectors and regions of the U.S. economy. Connecting employment by industry and the flows of workers across state lines provides valuable information for economic and workforce development initiatives. The left side of the chart below shows the number of people leaving their jobs in a particular industry and moving away from New York State (NYS), compared to the number of people moving to NYS and entering a job in that same industry (right side). For example, between 2010 and the 3rd quarter of 2015, about 28,000 people working in manufacturing in NYS left the state to work elsewhere, compared to 22,500 who moved to NYS and were hired into manufacturing jobs. For more data and tools on job-to-job transitions, please visit: https://j2jexplorer.ces.census.gov/ Read more

Re-plumbing New York State’s Roadside Ditches: Identifying a Critical Role for Decision-Makers

May 31, 2017
By Rebecca Schneider, Anthony Johnson, David Orr, Shorna Allred, and Sara Davis, Cornell University, Issue Number 78/May 2017

The quantity and quality of New York State’s (NYS) water resources have significant consequences for our economy, community well-being, and overall environmental sustainability. Recent analysis has highlighted the critical role that roadside ditches play in flooding, water pollution, and stream dry-outs. In NYS, networks of ditches crisscross the landscape, intercepting runoff from adjacent watersheds, rapidly shunting it farther down in the stream channel network where it is discharged as a high velocity faucet1. These inputs increase the magnitude of stream heights and peak water discharges by as much as 300 percent, contributing to flooding. Ditches are also highly efficient and rapid conduits of sediments, nutrients, de-icers, and fecal coliforms from adjacent land activities to downstream drinking water supplies2. Ditches are a significant source of sediment to streams and lakes when highway staff overscrape them and leave the bottom substrates exposed and unvegetated. As pressures from climatic extremes increase, the need for more thoughtful management of water resources and the role of roadside ditches is essential. Read more

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